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The Next Generation Gripen, or Gripen E, is the successor to today’s proven Gripen C/D, and is an aircraft that is both evolutionary and revolutionary. Evolutionary because the E is based on today’s in-service Gripen, the multi-role fighter ordered by five air forces worldwide. 

With about 250,000 flight hours behind it, Gripen has an indisputable track record for low operational costs and total life cycle costs that feeds directly into Gripen E.

At the same time, Gripen E is a revolutionary fighter because it combines advanced technology and operational effectiveness in an affordable package that no other fighter aircraft can hope to match.

Gripen E takes the tried and tested elements of the Gripen design, and improves on these. The new aircraft has a more powerful General Electric F414G engine with the ability to supercruise. Its redesigned airframe operates at higher weights, allowing more fuel and weapons to be carried. A unique avionics architecture makes weapons and systems integration even easier and quicker. The Gripen E operates with a fully-networked, fully-fused sensor and communications systems that gives it cutting edge capabilities for any mission, from close air support (CAS) to beyond visual range air-to-air combat.

Among the key missions systems that make Gripen E such a formidable future fighter is its all-new ES-05 Raven AESA (active electronically scanned antenna) radar.

The aircraft is equipped with a electronic warfare system that gives the it a unique active and passive electronic attack (EA) capability – which adds the AESA to the vital EA mission. ...

"We are pushing two generations ahead. Gripen has a strong market position, and development of the new 'E' variant is progressing in line with time and budget estimates," says Ulf Nilsson, Saab's head of aeronautics at Saab's annual Gripen seminar. For Sweden's order of 60 planes, a first test aircraft will soon be ready. Saab's incremental platform development methods result in shorter lead times to customers, he says.

As per the latest update at the Seminar, the Brazil programme is at full speed ahead. 50 Brazilian engineers who have arrived in Linkoping are now an integrated part of the Gripen program.

Ulf also talked about why Saab believes in true technology transfer. “Why do we want to share our technology? While our competitors see technology sharing as a risk, we see it as an opportunity. This is the way to grow forward and gain new partners. To achieve sustainability in the transfer of technology program, we have to build technology around the program. It’s a strategic decision for Saab and Sweden,” he says.

Unveiled during the Gripen Annual Seminar, this video shows some behind-the-scene highlights from the first next generation Gripen test aircraft in production. 

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The first group of 50 Brazilian professionals,who reached Swedenlast year, is now activelyparticipating in the Gripen NG development.

For a Brazilian engineer, snow covered hangars and sunsets at around 3 pm are things that are in stark contrast to life in their home country. Marcelo, one of the 50 professionals from Brazil, is however delighted. Marcelo is an Embraer engineer since 1998. It will be his first chance to work on the development of a supersonic jet.

"One of the differences is that in supersonic flights, the temperature of the vehicle is high (as a result of kinetic heating caused by the friction between the outside air and the surface of the aircraft) which means the cooling capacity of the system is important," he says.

Marcelo is working with Erik Israelsson, systems engineer at Saab, who cannot hide his excitement of working with colleagues from a different country. Erik says that short courses have been created for the Brazilian engineers."I think it will be very useful to work with new people in the 'Saab way."

By 2022, more than 350 Brazilian professionals will work on Gripen NG project in Sweden.

Read the full story here.

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A fighter aircraft should be able to operate 24 hours. However, night flying is slightly different and comes with its own set of challenges. Hence, night flying trainings are extremely important. 

With the integration of the latest in technology, Gripen is able to detect and destroy a wide variety of targets, even at night or in poor weather conditions. As the human eyes have only limited night vision capabilities, night vision goggles are crucial. The usage of night vision devices goes back as far as World War II. Technological advancements over the years have made these devices more accurate and user friendly for today’s fighter pilots.  

Besides being Night Vision Goggles (NVG) compatible, Gripen is also equipped with high intensity LED landing lights that are NVG friendly and emit significantly less infra-red radiation than a standard halogen light. The New Generation Gripen fighters will be integrated with LED landing lights that will deliver a peak intensity greater than 200,000cd and taxi lights that will have a peak intensity performance greater than 27,000cd.

Along with technology, getting used to the skies during night hours is also very important. The pilots need to get used to visibility difference, extra weight of night vision goggles and limited pilotage (as compared to day-time). 

For the Norbotten Wing, October usually marks the start of the night flying training sessions. The training usually continues for six months with a dedicated day every week. ​

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During the air display which concluded the ceremony, the Hungarian Gripen fighters formed the number ten in the sky above Kecskemét airbase.

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Taxing to the runway.GRIPEN10years_79.jpg The flight line with ready to go Gripen fighters.

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This is the Gripen model that was handed over to the base commander.

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The audience listens to the presentation on the first ten years with Gripen in the Hungarian Air Force.

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The ceremony included a hand-over to the Hungarian Air Force by the Swedish Air Force support group. 

This year marks ten years of Gripen in the Hungarian Air Force. To celebrate this milestone, a ‘Gripen decade’ ceremony was held in March this year at Szentgyörgyi Dezső Airbase in Kecskemét. Representatives of the Hungarian Government, the Hungarian and Swedish Armed Forces and Saab were present at the ceremony.

In 2001, the Swedish and Hungarian governments entered into a lease-purchase agreement, with a further modification in 2003, which included 14 Gripen C/D (12 single-seat plus two twin-seat) aircraft. All Gripen fighters were delivered in 2006 and 2007 and, by the end of 2008, the 14 aircraft were in operational service with the Hungarian Air Force. In January 2012, the leasing agreement with Sweden was extended until 2026. 

With Gripen, the Hungarian Air Force has established itself as a modern and effective NATO Air Force. Last year, the Hungarian Air Force had sent four Gripen fighters and about 80 personnel to guard the Baltic States of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The four months long Baltic Air Policing mission ...

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From top-of-the-class in the United States to test pilot at Saab: Marcus Wandt is one of the chosen few whose job it is to get Gripen E ready for its maiden flight.

The engineer, fighter pilot and former airborne ranger has been employed full time as a test pilot at Saab for a couple of years. Right now, a lot of the work involves getting Gripen E flight-ready.

“It’s my job to observe and analyse how the aircraft operates,” he says. “There’s a high degree of engineering thinking involved. When a fighter pilot finds that ‘it’s difficult to aim’, it’s the responsibility of the test pilot to go one step further and find out how many degrees the nose is swinging.”

Wandt has, over a period of one and a half years at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS), flown a number of different types of aircraft – everything from gliders and 50-year-old taildraggers to seaplanes and modern fighter aircraft.

“It’s incredibly stimulating to go along on that journey,” he says. “I’ve never previously experienced the same subtle communication between a fighter aircraft and pilot. When I sit in the aircraft, I feel enormous respect for the engineers behind the system. Everyone who has toiled on their small part of the project is involved.”

Read the full story here.​

"We are pushing two generations ahead. Gripen has a strong market position, and development of the new 'E' variant is progressing in line with time and budget estimates," says Ulf Nilsson, Saab's head of aeronautics at Saab's annual Gripen seminar. For Sweden's order of 60 planes, a first test aircraft will soon be ready. Saab's incremental platform development methods result in shorter lead times to customers, he says.

As per the latest update at the Seminar, the Brazil programme is at full speed ahead. 50 Brazilian engineers who have arrived in Linkoping are now an integrated part of the Gripen program.

Ulf also talked about why Saab believes in true technology transfer. “Why do we want to share our technology? While our competitors see technology sharing as a risk, we see it as an opportunity. This is the way to grow forward and gain new partners. To achieve sustainability in the transfer of technology program, we have to build technology around the program. It’s a strategic decision for Saab and Sweden,” he says.

Unveiled during the Gripen Annual Seminar, this video shows some behind-the-scene highlights from the first next generation Gripen test aircraft in production. 

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“The partnership with Saab will be more than Gripen. It would be a natural step to jointly develop a new product, a successor to the Gripen,” said Jackson Schneider, president and CEO, Embraer.

“We will inaugurate our plant in August-September. It will be our base for cooperation with Saab, and that's where we will adapt the Gripen aircraft for our Air Force’s needs and develop the two-seater version of Gripen NG,” he added.

According to Schneider, Gripen is the perfect plane for Latin America. 

Schneider said that the Gripen programme is important for Brazil because it is an important step in boosting an already large aerospace and defence industry.

“But it is still Saab in Sweden that will deliver most of the Gripen NG fighters and by 2019, both the Swedish and the Brazilian Air Force will get their first Swedish-built Gripen E,” he maintains.

Read the full story here.

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Swedish Air Force Gripen has now been integrated with the MBDA Meteor air-to-air missile (AAM), reports UPI.

“After extensive testing by FMV and the Gripen Operational Test and Evaluation unit, all of the new MS20 functions including the Meteor missile are now fully integrated with Gripen. The Swedish Air Force is now in its Initial Operational Capability phase with the Meteor. The Meteor missile is currently the most lethal radar-guided missile in operational service, and the Swedish Air Force is the only operational user so far. I am very proud and satisfied to have the Meteor in the inventory of my air force” said Major General Mats Helgesson, Chief-of-Staff of the Swedish Air Forces.

This missile can shoot down airborne threats launched from a distance of more than 100km. Its unique solid-fuel throttleable ducted rocket, also known as a ramjet, allows the missile to maintain very high speed all the way to the target, giving increased stand-off and disengagement ranges and greater ability to chase and destroy highly agile moving targets.

As per Saab, BVRAAM’s unrivalled no-escape-zone (three times greater than any current BVR missile) will dominate the future air-to-air battlespace, giving a decisive capability to Gripen and its pilots.

The missile has been jointly developed by Sweden, France, Italy, Spain, Germany and Great Britain.

"Combined with the IRIS-T heat-seeking missile, we have the best air-to-air weaponry you can find in the world," said Major General Helgesson.

Read the full story here.

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For its next Iceland mission, Czech Gripen fighters would be armed with AMRAAM (air-to-air) missiles. It will be the first time when Czech Air Force pilots would get an opportunity to train with AMRAAM outside the country.

“For pilots, this will be a new experience and opportunity to train outside the Czech territory," says Czech Defence Minister Martin Stropnický.

The participating contingent includes 70 personnel and four Gripen fighters. Most of these personnel are the ones who have not participated in the Iceland mission in 2014 and 2015. Currently, these 70 men and women are undergoing training e.g. SERE (survival, evasion, resistance and extraction) training. The first group will leave for Iceland in September.

"Air Policing mission type is among the main tasks of the Army of the Czech Republic in the framework of our activities in this year's foreign operations. We strive to expand the range of deployability of our Air Force," said Chief of General Staff, Czech Armed Forces, Joseph Bečvář.

Meanwhile in Sweden, the Swedish Air Force and FMV successfully integrated the MBDA Meteor BVRAAM missile last week. The integration was a part of the MS20 upgrade which delivers a host of new capability options for air-to-air, air-to-surface and ISTAR missions plus many improved mission systems and other changes.

Read the full story here​.

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Welcome to the official Gripen blog by Saab. This site features information and commentary about the Gripen fighter jet. 

The Gripen Blog shares stories and discussions on the Gripen aircraft. The Blog does not vouch for the authenticity of the reports from other publications that have been quoted. 

The reference to articles and news reports does not imply endorsement or validation of the views of the authors of the stories.


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