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Czech Republic’s Ministry of Defense recently announced that it is in the process of procuring Gripen fighter terminals that will allow them to ensure classified data communication. 

Petr Medek, Defense Ministry spokesman, stated that using these terminals in the avionics of the existing Gripen aircrafts will help increase the operational capabilities in the area of classified communication. The technology is also needed for the aircraft to be full-fledged participants in Joint Alliance operations.

Czech Republic will be acquiring 15 terminals, of which 14 will be incorporated into the existing 14 aircraft and 1 will be a spare. 

The Czech army currently has a total of 14 Gripen aircraft on lease. The terminals purchased, however, will be completely owned and operated by the Czech army. 

Read the full storyhere​.

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According to a new cooperation plan signed by the Czech Republic and Slovakia, the two countries will jointly protect their airspace, reports Boston Herald.

The Czech Defence Ministry said that the protection that both the countries receive as NATO members is effective only for military threats. The cooperation plan, however, would cover non-military threats such as a terror attack committed with a civilian passenger jet, as well.

The pact has been approved by the Slovak government but still requires parliamentary and presidential approvals before coming in to effect.

Czech Republic uses Gripen C/D fighter jets for which Slovakia is in negotiation with Sweden to acquire. The Slovakian military uses Russian MiG-29 jets which were acquired in 2004.

Read the full story here.

Photo: Jorgen Nilsson

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Global supplier of wing, fuselage and engine structures, GKN Aerospace has been given a contract extension to continue to provide Gripen's engine support program, reports UPI.

The contract extension encompasses the company's RM12 engines on fighters which is flown by the Air Force of Sweden as well as by countries like Hungary, the Czech Republic and Thailand.

GKN will continue providing technical support as well as provide maintenance and parts required for the engines that power the Gripen aircrafts. GKN also stated that the RM12 engines had clocked in an approximate 250,000 flight hours without any engine related issues arising.   

"GKN Aerospace is proud of our long-term support for Swedish fighter aircraft and we appreciate that the FMV has extended the RM12 PBL-contract," said Mike McCann, CEO of GKN Aerospace Engine Systems. "GKN is looking forward to continuing to work together with the Swedish Armed Forces and the FMV and to further develop our relationship.  We recognize and appreciate the continued confidence that the FMV has demonstrated in our team in placing this contract extension with us."

Currently, the technical support, maintenance and parts supply division by GKN is conducted from its facility in Trollhattan, Sweden.      

Read the full story here.

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Slovakia is looking to replace its aging Russian MiG-29 fighters and Gripen is one of the main contenders, reports Reuters.

The Slovakian government has been in talks with suppliers since September in order to negotiate the best prices. According to Sweden's, Defence Minister Peter Gajdos, it would take months for the government to decide on a supplier.

The Slovakian government, with Czech Republic, signed a “Joint Sky” agreement last December which would ensure protection of each other’s airspace besides the standard air defense cooperation between the two NATO members. Czech Republic currently has 14 leased Saab Gripens which it signed in 2004. If Slovakia were to pick Gripen as its primary fleet then the two countries could also, possibly, share maintenance costs and pilot training.

Read the full story here.

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Between 14 and 18 February 2017, we will showcase our cutting edge technology at the 11th edition of Aero India airshow.

Besides Gripen, we will also be exhibiting our world-leading capabilities in air power, aircraft, ground-based air defence and surveillance systems, as well as naval technology.

We are offering the next generation Gripen to India under the 'Make In India' initiative with transfer of technology.

The first Aero India was held in 1996. It is one of Asia's most important airshows that has a participation of exhibitors from almost 33 countries with 600+ companies. 

Aero India 2017 will be held at Air Force Station, Yelahanka, Bengaluru, India.

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In an interview with the Defence Aviation Post, Saab India’s Country Head and Chairman Jan Widerström throws some light on Saab's ready-to-roll Make in India plan that is based on true technology transfer.

"We do not attach strings to our technology. Saab is committed to India and will deliver the best industrial cooperation and technology transfer over the life of the programme — providing what India’s armed forces and industry wants and needs," Jan  says.

When asked about the unique capabilities of Gripen that Saab would leverage to gain substantial mileage over its competitors, Jan said that Gripen E is equipped with the latest technology when it comes to radar, sensors and electronic warfare systems along with customisable aircrafts that that can quite easily integrate existing and new weapon and missile systems.

“Gripen can perform a wide range of missions such as Offensive Counter Air, Defensive Counter Air, Air Policing, Cruise Missile Defense, Close Air Support, Air Interdiction, Suppression/Destruction of Enemy Air Defense (SEAD/DEAD), Maritime Strike, Strategic Attack, Sea Surveillance, Tactical Air Reconnaissance and Non-Traditional ISR. These missions can be performed around the clock in all types of weather,” Jan said.

About Saab’s aerospace facility offer, Jan said that the company intended to make the facility fully self-sufficient with 100% technology transfer, full system control and full software control. Saab will transfer design, development and manufacturing capabilities. Saab believes everything can be done in India including production planning, creation of an independent supply chain and research and development for the future. ...

Flight data, track data and night vision.

The Swedish Air Force have ordered  the advanced helmet mounted display system, Targo for their Gripen E fighter aircraft. Pilots equipped with Targo will be able to better locate, track and identify targets, both day and night.

Read more about the Helmet Mounted Display system here​.​

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FAB Gripen pilots Captain Gustavo de Oliveira Pascotto and Captain Ramon Santos Fórneas, trained with pilots of four different nations to develop new techniques at a recently held Gripen User Group Simulation event.  

During a virtual fight, the two pilots led seven other pilots to fight against 40 enemy aircraft in a series of attack and counter-attack missions. At the end of this fight, the group took down the enemy from a distance of 80 kms.

"The highlight of the training was the fact that it was very realistic. The pilots felt like they were actually flying," Fórneas said.

"Since the training involved complex scenarios, and pilots of different nationalities and experiences participated, it was an excellent opportunity to assess our level of training of beyond visual range air-to-air combat, and find the best ways to use Gripen,” Captain Pascotto said.

Captain Pascotto and Captain Fórneas were the first FAB pilots who were sent to Sweden to learn to fly Gripen. They fulfilled their first Gripen training mission in November 2014. 

Read the full story here.

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“The reason for Gripen E's success is relatively simple - it has been developed as a robust and cost-sensitive plane. The fighter builds on the successful design of earlier versions and is not completely redesigned,” a report in Stern says about why the Gripen fighter system became the choice of a number of air forces.

Gripen was developed keeping in mind the Cold War philosophy. The idea was to have a cost-efficient multi-role fighter which could take-off and land on short landing strips. Once developed, Gripen was not just used for the Swedish Air Force, but also exported to countries like Thailand, South Africa, the Czech Republic and Hungary. The latest big order from Brazil has made Gripen the most talked about fighter of the recent times.

The all new Gripen E is super flexible, has an enviable 10-minute operational turnaround time, and boasts of split avionics and a modular system. The split avionics also means that new upgrades and products can be easily added to Gripen at any point in future, without much hassle.

The report also talks about Gripen F, the two seater version of Gripen E that Sweden will produce jointly with Brazil. Gripen F will not just be used as a training aircraft, but also as a fighter for complex missions. After Brazil, India has also shown great interest in the Gripen fighter system. Saab has offered Gripen NG to India under the 'Make In India' initiative with transfer of technology.

Read the full story 

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Welcome to the official Gripen blog by Saab. This site features information and commentary about the Gripen fighter jet. 

The Gripen Blog shares stories and discussions on the Gripen aircraft. The Blog does not vouch for the authenticity of the reports from other publications that have been quoted. 

The reference to articles and news reports does not imply endorsement or validation of the views of the authors of the stories.


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