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The Swedish Air Force Gripen pilots are working on honing some old skills by practicing Gripen take-offs and landings from normal roads. The skill helps to spread the fighters on multiple locations in the event of an attack.

Gripen is a fighter which was developed keeping in mind the Cold War philosophy, which means it doesn't always need a runway to land and take-off. It can land and take-off on short, actual roads as well. Sweden has military bases that use normal roads that have been strengthened for practicing such exercises.  

According to Flight Attorney General, Brigadier General Gabor Nagy, such exercises are very important. "If a potential opponent attacks our regular flight bases and limits our take-off and landing opportunities, we should be ready with our strategy. So we have developed a concept to increase the areas of operations beyond the regular air bases. What has begun here today is an extension of this strategy, where we will measure road sections so that we can land fighter aircraft with relatively simple means," he says.

Read the full story here.

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21151199_1480166175371968_9152644462323412624_n.jpgThe flying display by Gripenfighters

21191988_1480151408706778_7948279422638542240_n.jpgSix generations of Saab fighter aircraft in flight formation

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Gripen on static display

The (main) Flight Day of Swedish Armed Forces is over. According to Carl-Johan Edström, Wing Commander of F 21, it was a very successful event. "I am impressed with the way my staff has been able to conduct their regular military exercises to increase the military capability along with preparing such an event for the public," he says.

One of the main goals of the event was to present a good mix of fighter aircraft for the visitors - which included many high school students - to see. One of the visitors, named Max Nilsson from Stockholm, experienced the Flight Day for the first time. "I think it's really cool and fun to be here and see the planes. The best part of the day was to see Gripen and Viggen. 

Image Courtesy: Försvarsmakten

Czech International Air Fest (CIAF), the largest airshow in the Czech Republic, will be held on 2nd and 3rd September and Gripen will be one of the main attractions to the event.

The video shows Czech Gripen's performance at CIAF 2016.

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Joint exercises with other air forces make for a real test of pilot skills and aircraft capability when pitted against other types of aircraft and pilots trained in very different environments. The Arctic Fighter meet is one such exercise where Gripen pilots test out their skills. Every year, air forces of Sweden, Norway, and Finland participate in this joint exercise with different types of aircraft. 

The Baltic Post reports that the participating aircraft for this year’s exercise includes F-16 and Hornets, apart from Gripen. The Norwegian, Swedish and Finnish Air Forces will train together to develop and improve interoperability, train new pilots in joint missions and improve reaction times to airspace incursions.

According toForsvarsmakten, rigorous preparation of months goes behind this joint exercise. Special emphasis is given to flight safety in these high-risk training missions. This year, the exercise will be held between 21 and 25 August.

Read the full story here.

Photo: Sören Nielsen​​​

​CNBC's Managing Editor Shereen Bhan was in Linköping last week to see what goes behind the production of Gripen E and experience a flight in Gripen.

Bhan traveled to Sweden for CNBC-TV18’s special series ‘Make In India: A New Deal For Defence’. Saab has made public its offer to develop, manufacture and assemble Gripen fighters in India should the country choose it.

Bhan flew with Saab’s Wing Commander Flying, Hans Einerth, who showed her the agility and speed of the aircraft during the 55 minutes sortie. She had the control for ten minutes.

For Bhan, it was a memorable ride. She has almost lived her entire life near air force bases as her father was a fighter pilot. "It was one of the coolest moments of my life," she says.

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He got a flying license before a driver's license. SwAF display pilot Henrik Björling talks about his preparations for Sweden's Flying Day on 26 August.

Henrik, 36, has flown for over half of life. Among the many aircraft he has flown in the last 18 years, Gripen is his favourite. 

"It is one of the most modern aircraft in the world. It is an aircraft built for the pilot to perform at the highest level," he says.

When asked about his preparations for Sweden's flying Day performance, he says, “The exercise will happen this month. Like any other sport, I exercise daily so that I am all ready to play my role in the display. Just an hour before my flight, I stop talking and start with my mental preparation. I review the entire program visually. I check the weather – if it is sunny, windy and so on. And then I get on the plane and just do it!”

Read the full story here.

Image Courtesy: Forsvarsmakten​

Saab test pilot Marcus Wandt explains how he prepared for Gripen E's first flight.​

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At 10:32 on 15 June 2017, Gripen E took off on its maiden flight, flown by a Saab test pilot. The aircraft (designation 39-8) left from Saab’s airfield in Linköping, Sweden and flew over the eastern parts of Östergötland for 40 minutes. During the flight, the aircraft carried out a number of actions to demonstrate various test criteria including the retracting and extending of the landing gear.

“The flight was just as expected, with the aircraft performance matching the experience in our simulations. Its acceleration performance is impressive with smooth handling. Needless to say, I’m very happy to have piloted this maiden flight,” says Marcus Wandt, Experimental Test Pilot, Saab.

Read more here.

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The low building in an industrial area in Arboga reveals nothing about the high level of technical interaction between Swedish and Brazilian engineers that goes on inside. For seven months, Marcelo Tonial and his two colleagues from AEL Sistemas are spending their days developing the knowledge on how to build and optimize the resources required to maintain the avionics units on Gripen. They are there to acquire the knowledge required to set up a workshop in Brazil for maintaining 36 Gripen fighters ordered for the Brazilian Air Force. “Going to Sweden for the technology transfer process was something I really wanted to be involved in,” says Tonial, who has temporarily left his position at the Research and Development department at AEL Sistemas to lead the Brazilian team in Sweden.

Marcelo Tonial and his colleagues are only three of nearly 350 professionals from Saab's Brazilian partner companies and the Brazilian Air Force that are involved in the Transfer of Technology (ToT), the industrial cooperation and technical exchange programme between the two countries that began in October 2015 and will last until 2024. The aim is to provide the Brazilian aerospace industry with the technology and knowledge needed to develop, assemble and maintain Gripen in Brazil.

In the technology transfer program, the sharing of knowledge goes two ways. AEL Sistemas develops and manufactures technological solutions for defence and security in air and on land and has developed the electronic display for the Gripen aircraft in Brazil.

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Gripen has for the first time undergone a series of test flights with 100% biofuel. This demonstrates that the aircraft can be flown with an alternative fuel and gives valuable knowledge for future possible use of alternative fuel.

“Demonstrating that Gripen can fly with 100% biofuel is an important step in making Gripen future-safe,” says Göran Bengtsson, Director of Research and Technology, Future Business, Aeronautics. “Gaining independence from imports of oil is important from a defence standpoint and opens the way for additional sources of fuel, which creates flexibility. It's naturally also good if we in the long term can contribute to reducing environmental impact from military aviation.”

This was the first time that a single engine fighter flew with 100% biofuel. The flights were conducted with a Gripen D (dualseat) at Saab’s facilities in Linköping and went entirely as planned.

Read the full story here​.​

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