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Check out this video from the Gotland exercise where marine units along with units from the air force and the home guard practiced protection, guarding, escorting and combat. 

Over five days, naval units practised along with units from the Air Force and the Home Guard in and around the island.  

Third and fourth naval squadron corvettes escorted units from Amfibieregementet during a journey from the mainland to the island. This was backed by Gripen fighters from F17. Upon arrival at Visby harbour, they met troops of the 32nd Home Guard battalion that guarded and protected the harbour.

The exercise tested the preparedness of Swedish units for different situations. It is important to conduct exercises, major or minor, as individual units or in conjunction with others to maintain mission preparedness, says a forsvarsmakten report.


Between 6 and 16 October 2014, Swedish Air Force Gripen pilots were at RAF Lossiemouth in Scotland to participate in Joint Warrior, Europe’s largest military exercise.

Joint Warrior is a multinational NATO exercise involving all three of the UK’s Armed Forces – the Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force.

With a participation of more than 22 warships and submarines, 52 fixed wing aircraft, and a total of nearly 3,500 personnel from various countries across the globe, Joint Warrior provides a good opportunity to test the incident preparedness capabilities of the Armed Forces.

The two week drill includes a range of modern, realistic simulated scenarios. The participants are divided into red (enemy forces) and blue (coalition forces) teams for practicing air to air wars. Every participating nation gets to be a part of both red and blue team. 

"Since we are a partner nation, operating with NATO countries gives us a lot when it comes to interoperability. Also, different British squadrons have a lot of experience from operations and working abroad and we also get a piece of that knowledge when we co-operate with them," says Lt Col Adam Nelson in an interview with Forces TV​.

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Saab has received an order for Gripen E role equipment, along with support and maintenance equipment worth approximately SEK 5.8 billion.

On 15 February 2013, Saab signed an agreement with the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) covering activity for the Gripen E from 2013 to 2026. Also during 2013 three more orders were received , linked to the development and production of Gripen E.

“Work with Gripen E goes according to schedule and budget. This order represents another important step in Saab's commitment to deliver the next generation of the Gripen system to Sweden,” says Lennart Sindahl, Senior Executive Vice President of Saab and Head of Saab's business area Aeronautics.

The order announced yesterday is the fourth one under the Gripen E agreement between Saab and FMV announced on 15 February 2013.​

Read the full storyhere​

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The Gripen fleet at Norrbotten Wing has started practicing missions in dark starting last week, reports forsvarsmakten.

It is not a new practice.Night flying exercises have been conducted for several years and October usually marks the start of the training sessions. This month, pilots at air wing F17 in Luleå, northern Sweden will fly night training sorties every Thursday.

The beauty of night operations in northern Sweden is that it can be conducted during daylight hours, i.e. until 18.00, because a large part of the day is dark during the winter months, the report says.

“Night flying is important for the air force as the aircraft are supposed to fly in daylight as well as night time and in every weather condition,” says Squadron Commander Jörgen Marqvardsen.

According to the report, about 14 night flights will be conducted between October 2014 and March 2015.

Read the full story: Mörkerflygningar på torsdagar

Image Courtesy: Louise Levin

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Swedish Air Force Gripen pilots recently participated in exercise MACE XVI, a leading international electronic warfare training event hosted by Slovakia, reports forsvarsmakten.

The purpose of the exercise was to train methods of overcoming anti-air defences by the use of tactical aircraft in conditions of radio-electronic interference and to practice air combat in fighters.

More than 650 personnel from various NATO countries and Australia and Sweden participated in the exercise. Besides Gripen, participating aircraft included F-16 from Belgium, Denmark and Norway , the German Learjet 40  and the French Rafale.

All the air equipment was being looked after by Sliac Airbase, with the command located in Zvolen and the ground equipment stationed at the training facility at Lest in Central Slovakia.

According to the report, the exercise was a unique opportunity for the participating Swedish Air Force members to test and develop their countermeasure response and effectiveness.

“The Air Force has once again proved itself at international exercises. Thanks to our competent staff who ensured 100 percent availability of the aircraft. We have flown in a variety of missions in different countries. Other nations have appreciated our flexibility and expertise. The experience we bring is invaluable, both in terms of validation of capabilities and improvement needed,” says Pierre Ziherl, Contingent Commander, Swedish Air Force.

This is the second time that Slovakia hosted this exercise. The previous one was held in 2012.

Read the full story: MACE XVI​

Image Courtesy:  forsvarsmakten

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Four Gripen from Air Wing 17 (F17) in Ronneby were at the Estonian airbase Ämari to participate in the 19th BRTE training event between 30 September and 1 October, reports forsvarsmakten​.

BRTEs (Baltic Region Training Event) are routine training events to hone NATO's air capability and exercise rotational NATO Air Policing assets.

It was the first time that the Swedish Gripen were in Estonia to participate in the event along with aircraft from Portugal – F16, Canada’s CF-18, Germany’s EF-2000, Estonia’s L-410, F18, Netherlands’ F16 and Finland’s F18.

"An important goal of this exercise is to practice in cooperation with other countries and thereby increase interoperability,"said Lieutenant Colonel Jorgen Axelsson.

One of the exercise scenarios includes an aircraft that loses radio contact with the radio aircraft control. Other aircraft are then sent to intercept and if needed, escort the unknown aircraft out of the prohibited airspace. 

BRTEs are planned and executed by NATO and Sweden was invited as a member of the Partnership for Peace.

Read the full story: Flygövning i Estland​

Photo Courtesy: Christian Timmig​ (first image) and Kent Löving/ Swedish Armed Forces (second image) 

​In a rare display of its kind, three generations of Saab's fighter aircraft - Gripen, Viggen and Draken - came together to perform a flypast at the recently held NATO Days in Ostrava & Air Force Days at Mošnov airport.

Four Czech pilots - Michal Danek, Ervin Um, Merta and Martin Pelda were awarded at the event for flying a thousand hours in Gripen.

To see the three aircraft together, one usually needs to travel to Sweden. Hence, it was a unique opportunity for more than 200, 000 visitors at the NATO Days in Ostrava & Air Force Days to witness the three Saab fighter aircraft in a flypast.

It was a demonstration that celebrated the past and the present.

Draken takes us to the days of a new beginning; the jet era had already started. Sweden wanted to develop an aircraft that could undertake a combat role unique to the country. It was important for the aircraft to be able to operate from reinforced public roads used as part of wartime airbases and to be refueled and rearmed as quickly as possible. Manufactured between 1955 and 1974, the Draken was first built to replace the Saab J29 Tunnan. The one of its kind aircraft entered service with the Swedish Air Force in 1960 and was successfully exported to Austria, Denmark and Finland as well.

More than a decade later, Viggen was conceptualized with an aim to replace the Saab 32 Lansen in the attack role and later the Saab 35 ...

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Last month, several Swedish Gripen fighter aircraft were sent from Ronneby airbase to intercept two Russian Su-24 Fencer combat planes that violated Sweden’s airspace, reports Expressen.

According to the report, on 17 September, the two Russian combat planes skirted the Polish coast before heading north at low altitude towards the island Öland, in the Baltic Sea. The planes flew a couple of kilometers on the wrong side of the border and quickly turned eastward when a Swedish Gripen intercepted.

The Swedish Armed Forces have refused to comment on the incident before a proper analysis of the situation. According to Expressen’s sources, however, this incident was aimed at testing Sweden’s air defense readiness.

As early as August this year, the Swedish Armed Forces had announced that it had increased intelligence gathering and had called in extra staff to its headquarters over the crisis in Ukraine.

The developments in Ukraine have led to increased training activity in the Baltic Sea. In August, the Swedish Air Force deployed two Gripen fighter aircraft in Gotland where the jets would be in a better position to react quickly to the situation in the Baltic.

Read the full story: Svenskt luftrum kränkt av ryska attackplan

​It all started in 1965 when Sweden invited some British journalists to visit its Air Force and the Saab facilities. The journalists found the visit to be very fruitful and informative and they suggested that the Swedish Air Force should have its own fan club of international and Swedish journalists who would annually receive information about developments in the Air Force and the aerospace industry.

The Air Force and press officers liked the idea and starting 1966, a meeting of journalists is held every year either in London or at Le Bourget, near the northeastern suburbs of Paris.

This year, in July, about 150 journalists from all over the world gathered in London to attend this Swedish Air Force Fan Club Annual Meet, reports Forsvarsmakten.se.

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Brigadier General Albert Safar, Head of the Hungarian Air Force, addressing the journalists

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Swedish Air Force chief Micael Bydén was the host of the Fan Club Meeting

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Hungarian Air Force Chief, Brigadier General Albert Safar, Mats Gyllander, Chairman SAFF and Micael Bydén, Swedish Air Force Chief

Swedishairforcefanclub4.jpgSwedish Armed Forces Communications Director Erik Lagersten talks to a few foreign journalists​

Guest speaker at the meeting, Brigadier General Albert Safar, head of the Hungarian Air Force, gave the journalists an overview of Hungary's experiences in establishing the Gripen aircraft in its air defenses. 

Swedish Air Force chief, Major General Micael Bydén gave an introduction of the MS 20 upgrade of Gripen C/D aircraft followed by the latest updates on it. Bydén also talked about Gripen E and the Swedish Air ...

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Swedish Air Force has deployed two Gripen fighter aircraft in Gotland because of the increased training exercises in the Baltic Sea, reports Sverigesradio.

Last month, the Swedish Armed Forces said that it had increased intelligence gathering and had called in extra staff to its headquarters over the crisis in Ukraine.

According to Swedish Armed Forces spokesperson Philip Simon, the two Swedish fighter jets are part of a so-called incident rotation. Stationed in Gotland, they would be in a better position to react quickly to the situation in the Baltic.

Read the full story:Höjd beredskap med två Jas Gripen på Gotland

Image Courtesy: Swedish Armed Forces

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