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The future is always uncertain. So the pilots of the future need an aircraft that can be easily upgraded to meet ever-changing requirements.

“Computers, processors and electronics are continuously developing and it’s important that you can upgrade these as new tech emerges in the market,” says Saab’s Wing Commander Flying and Gripen test pilot Hans Einerth.

Right from the beginning, Gripen E was developed with future progress in mind. By managing to isolate systems affecting the core flight abilities, the plane’s split avionics system allows for integration of off-the-shelf products.

“The future pilot will need the ability to continuously upgrade the hardware and software and not get stuck in old functionality; this is of increasing importance,” explains Einerth.

Read the full story here​.

​Gripen E was presented to the world on 18 May 2016. This aircraft presented was the first of the three test aircraft which will support the Gripen E programme. Attended by more than 500 guests, the Gripen Evolution event also included an aerial display by a Gripen C and a static display of a SwAF Gripen upgraded to the MS20 configuration.​ Here are some images from the roll out.

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For more images and videos, visit Saab.​

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As a part of Saab's industrial cooperation commitment to Brazil, Atech Negocios em Tecnologia has been selected to provide simulators, training systems and ground support systems for Gripen NG. The announcement of the partnership between Saab and Atech was made on 26 April.

Earlier this year, seven Atech engineers underwent initial training at Saab facilities in Linköping as part of the Gripen technology transfer programme.  

“Saab and Atech have entered into a partnership regarding the development simulators, training systems and ground support systems for Gripen NG. We will provide technology transfer within these areas to Atech and we now welcome the first team of Atech engineers for training in developing the Gripen system”, says Mikael Franzén, Programme Director for Gripen Brazil at Saab.

“Atech is proud to participate together with Saab in the Gripen NG programme. Atech has a strong history in supporting the Brazilian Air Force in technology transfer programmes. Our participation represents a consolidation of Atech expertise in areas such as Mission Planning and Simulation Systems. We are ready to join forces with Saab, working as an integrated team, to support the Brazilian Air Force on its long-term needs”, says Edson Carlos Mallaco, President and CEO of Atech.

Read the full story here​.

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Gripen can operate from a runway no wider than a road, and fly missions in challenging environments anywhere in the world. 

Photo: Daniel Nilsson

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The Next Generation Gripen, or Gripen E, is the successor to today’s proven Gripen C/D, and is an aircraft that is both evolutionary and revolutionary. Evolutionary because the E is based on today’s in-service Gripen, the multi-role fighter ordered by five air forces worldwide. 

With about 250,000 flight hours behind it, Gripen has an indisputable track record for low operational costs and total life cycle costs that feeds directly into Gripen E.

At the same time, Gripen E is a revolutionary fighter because it combines advanced technology and operational effectiveness in an affordable package that no other fighter aircraft can hope to match.

Gripen E takes the tried and tested elements of the Gripen design, and improves on these. The new aircraft has a more powerful General Electric F414G engine with the ability to supercruise. Its redesigned airframe operates at higher weights, allowing more fuel and weapons to be carried. A unique avionics architecture makes weapons and systems integration even easier and quicker. The Gripen E operates with a fully-networked, fully-fused sensor and communications systems that gives it cutting edge capabilities for any mission, from close air support (CAS) to beyond visual range air-to-air combat.

Among the key missions systems that make Gripen E such a formidable future fighter is its all-new ES-05 Raven AESA (active electronically scanned antenna) radar.

The aircraft is equipped with a electronic warfare system that gives the it a unique active and passive electronic attack (EA) capability – which adds the AESA to the vital EA mission. ...

"We are pushing two generations ahead. Gripen has a strong market position, and development of the new 'E' variant is progressing in line with time and budget estimates," says Ulf Nilsson, Saab's head of aeronautics at Saab's annual Gripen seminar. For Sweden's order of 60 planes, a first test aircraft will soon be ready. Saab's incremental platform development methods result in shorter lead times to customers, he says.

As per the latest update at the Seminar, the Brazil programme is at full speed ahead. 50 Brazilian engineers who have arrived in Linkoping are now an integrated part of the Gripen program.

Ulf also talked about why Saab believes in true technology transfer. “Why do we want to share our technology? While our competitors see technology sharing as a risk, we see it as an opportunity. This is the way to grow forward and gain new partners. To achieve sustainability in the transfer of technology program, we have to build technology around the program. It’s a strategic decision for Saab and Sweden,” he says.

Unveiled during the Gripen Annual Seminar, this video shows some behind-the-scene highlights from the first next generation Gripen test aircraft in production. 

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The first group of 50 Brazilian professionals,who reached Swedenlast year, is now activelyparticipating in the Gripen NG development.

For a Brazilian engineer, snow covered hangars and sunsets at around 3 pm are things that are in stark contrast to life in their home country. Marcelo, one of the 50 professionals from Brazil, is however delighted. Marcelo is an Embraer engineer since 1998. It will be his first chance to work on the development of a supersonic jet.

"One of the differences is that in supersonic flights, the temperature of the vehicle is high (as a result of kinetic heating caused by the friction between the outside air and the surface of the aircraft) which means the cooling capacity of the system is important," he says.

Marcelo is working with Erik Israelsson, systems engineer at Saab, who cannot hide his excitement of working with colleagues from a different country. Erik says that short courses have been created for the Brazilian engineers."I think it will be very useful to work with new people in the 'Saab way."

By 2022, more than 350 Brazilian professionals will work on Gripen NG project in Sweden.

Read the full story here.

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A fighter aircraft should be able to operate 24 hours. However, night flying is slightly different and comes with its own set of challenges. Hence, night flying trainings are extremely important. 

With the integration of the latest in technology, Gripen is able to detect and destroy a wide variety of targets, even at night or in poor weather conditions. As the human eyes have only limited night vision capabilities, night vision goggles are crucial. The usage of night vision devices goes back as far as World War II. Technological advancements over the years have made these devices more accurate and user friendly for today’s fighter pilots.  

Besides being Night Vision Goggles (NVG) compatible, Gripen is also equipped with high intensity LED landing lights that are NVG friendly and emit significantly less infra-red radiation than a standard halogen light. The New Generation Gripen fighters will be integrated with LED landing lights that will deliver a peak intensity greater than 200,000cd and taxi lights that will have a peak intensity performance greater than 27,000cd.

Along with technology, getting used to the skies during night hours is also very important. The pilots need to get used to visibility difference, extra weight of night vision goggles and limited pilotage (as compared to day-time). 

For the Norbotten Wing, October usually marks the start of the night flying training sessions. The training usually continues for six months with a dedicated day every week. ​

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During the air display which concluded the ceremony, the Hungarian Gripen fighters formed the number ten in the sky above Kecskemét airbase.

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Taxing to the runway.GRIPEN10years_79.jpg The flight line with ready to go Gripen fighters.

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This is the Gripen model that was handed over to the base commander.

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The audience listens to the presentation on the first ten years with Gripen in the Hungarian Air Force.

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The ceremony included a hand-over to the Hungarian Air Force by the Swedish Air Force support group. 

This year marks ten years of Gripen in the Hungarian Air Force. To celebrate this milestone, a ‘Gripen decade’ ceremony was held in March this year at Szentgyörgyi Dezső Airbase in Kecskemét. Representatives of the Hungarian Government, the Hungarian and Swedish Armed Forces and Saab were present at the ceremony.

In 2001, the Swedish and Hungarian governments entered into a lease-purchase agreement, with a further modification in 2003, which included 14 Gripen C/D (12 single-seat plus two twin-seat) aircraft. All Gripen fighters were delivered in 2006 and 2007 and, by the end of 2008, the 14 aircraft were in operational service with the Hungarian Air Force. In January 2012, the leasing agreement with Sweden was extended until 2026. 

With Gripen, the Hungarian Air Force has established itself as a modern and effective NATO Air Force. Last year, the Hungarian Air Force had sent four Gripen fighters and about 80 personnel to guard the Baltic States of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. The four months long Baltic Air Policing mission ...

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From top-of-the-class in the United States to test pilot at Saab: Marcus Wandt is one of the chosen few whose job it is to get Gripen E ready for its maiden flight.

The engineer, fighter pilot and former airborne ranger has been employed full time as a test pilot at Saab for a couple of years. Right now, a lot of the work involves getting Gripen E flight-ready.

“It’s my job to observe and analyse how the aircraft operates,” he says. “There’s a high degree of engineering thinking involved. When a fighter pilot finds that ‘it’s difficult to aim’, it’s the responsibility of the test pilot to go one step further and find out how many degrees the nose is swinging.”

Wandt has, over a period of one and a half years at the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS), flown a number of different types of aircraft – everything from gliders and 50-year-old taildraggers to seaplanes and modern fighter aircraft.

“It’s incredibly stimulating to go along on that journey,” he says. “I’ve never previously experienced the same subtle communication between a fighter aircraft and pilot. When I sit in the aircraft, I feel enormous respect for the engineers behind the system. Everyone who has toiled on their small part of the project is involved.”

Read the full story here.​

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Welcome to the official Gripen blog by Saab. This site features information and commentary about the Gripen fighter jet.