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Category: GRIPEN AIR FORCES

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South African Air Force Gripen fighters have been confirmed to participate in the annual SAAF Museum air show at AFB Zwartkop next month.

The annual air show, which will be held at Air Force Base Swartkop, is expected to be attended by more than 35000 visitors. Besides Gripen, Oryx and A109 helicopters, Casa 212 transport and BAE Hawk combat aircraft are also scheduled to participate in both static and aerial displays during the air show.

Gripen's performances include flyovers and demonstration of air strikes with Hawk jets and Rooivalk attack helicopters.

SAAF Museum Air Show will be held on 6th May 2017.

Read the full story here.

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At Kecskemét Air Base, Hungarian Air Force personnel maintain sufficient combat-readiness levels all year round to fulfil their commitment to protect and defend the airspace of Hungary. Aviation blogger Matteo Sanzani talks about the Kecskemét air base, and the roles and responsibilities of the three squadrons there.

Puma Tactical Fighter Squadron

Named after the Royal Hungarian Puma Fighter Wing of World War II, the squadron was established in October 1935. The squadron houses Gripen aircraft equipped with air-to-air and air-to-ground missiles. The main goal of this squadron is to protect and defend Hungarian and Slovenian airspace, with the latter being added in the framework of NATO commitment in October 2014. Other tasks of the squadron include conducting regular training flights, and participating in international airshows.

Dongo Tactical Training Fighter Squadron

The pilots of this squadron have all graduated from NATO flying training school in Canada after participating in a Gripen training programme in Sweden. The primary purpose of this squadron is to provide training to young Gripen pilots. The training covers the theory part which includes understanding Gripen technology, avionics system, communication system etc., simulator trailing followed by training flights.

Air Transport Squadron

This is the transport squadron at the Air Base and it operates five An-26. This squadron is supposed to carry out a number of tasks like transporting airborne troops and cargoes, participation in humanitarian relief operations, and participation in international exercises and airshows.

Read the full story here​.

Image Courtesy: Topidoc

​A Czech Air Force Gripen has been confirmed to participate at the annual Royal Naval Air Station (RNAS) Yeovilton International Air Day 2017.

According to Yeovilton Air Day's Facebook channel​, the Czech Gripen's routine is expected to feature spectacular flare launches. Gripen's display during it's last visit to Royal Naval Air Station Yeovilton won the Best Fixed Wing Display award.

The first RNAS Yeovilton International Air Day was held in 1947. About 40,000 visitors are expected to attend the show which will feature over five hours of flying and static displays by UK and international participants.

Besides flying displays, there will be other ground attractions like arena displays, simulators and fairground rides. RNAS Yeovilton Air Day 2017 will be held on Saturday, 8 July. 

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When Aviation blogger Matteo Sanzani reached Kecskemét Air Base to start his photo shoot of HuAF Gripen fighters, he was impressed with the fast paced activities that started at 9 am. 

Matteo's plan was to get into an An-26, a twin-engined turboprop civilian and military transport aircraft, and take pictures of two Gripen fighters. Before the flight, Matteo discussed the position and maneuvers of Gripen, intersections etc. with the Chief of Flight Operations at the Air Base.

At noon, the transport plane and the Gripen fighters were airborne. After reaching the agreed altitude, the Gripen fighters got into their positions. Without wasting a minute, Matteo started taking pictures. 

"The agility and power of the aircraft are amazing; during the maneuvers, in a second, the Gripen fighters were hundreds of meters away from the An-26,"Matteo noted.

After the shoot, Matteo talked to the Base Commander who gave him an overview of Hungarian Gripen's past, present and future activities. The Gripen Demo Team will perform at some of the most important European public events like Motril Airshow, AWACS 35th Anniversary, Air Tattoo, Sanicole Airshow and Ostrava Airshow, he said.

Read the full story here.

Photo@TopiDoc ​

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Swedish Defense Material Administration (FMV) recently awarded a contract to Saab to develop and produce a new generation anti-ship missile system for Gripen E fighters and Sweden's Visby-class corvettes, reports FlightGlobal. For this, Saab is partnering with German brand Diehl Defence, which will be supplying subsystems and performing final assembly and integration of the missile system. 

“The deal will deliver weapons with greatly improved capabilities to engage any target, in all [weather] conditions,” says Saab chief executive and President Håkan Buskhe.

According to Saab, RBS15F ER will weigh around 600kg (1,320lb), including a 200kg warhead. The new system is being developed for both air-launched and ship-launched missiles and hence can be integrated to Gripen E fighters and Sweden's Visby-class corvettes. 

While speaking about the new missile system and how it varies from the previous missiles in the RBS 15 family, Görgen Johannsen, head of Saab's Dynamic Business Area told Jane's​, "We of course build on our history, but the capabilities of this missile differ significantly from the earlier RBS15 variants in terms of range and seeker capability...yes it is a development from what we have done earlier, but it is a new missile. We have been asked to improve the all-weather capability and develop a significant range enhancement. When you see the missile you will observe similarities to what we have done before, but the customer has drawn up a totally different requirement, which makes this a completely different missile."

RBS15F ER anti-ship missile system is scheduled ...

Several of Saab’s larger deals include long-term industrial cooperations with customer countries. The goal is to create good value for both parties.

Many countries around the world have formal requirements and regulations in place which relate to industrial cooperation. 

“Even countries that don’t have such formal requirements often want Saab to contribute to their industrial development,” says Anders Edlund, Director at Saab Industrial Cooperation. “In some cases it involves increasing exports, in others it is purely a matter of security – they want to be able to maintain and upgrade the system they have purchased from us.” 

The most recent major business deal is Brazil’s purchase of 36 Gripen aircraft. The contract stipulates a number of requirements for industrial cooperation, including the training of Brazilian engineers and workshop personnel. By the end of 2024, more than 350 individuals from the Brazilian Air Force and Saab’s business partners will have taken part in training courses in Linköping, Sweden. 

The contract also includes a new hub for technology development and flight tests, which was inaugurated at the end of 2016. A local production facility will be built, and the assembly process at the site is set to begin in the early 2020s. In addition, various research projects are being conducted jointly with the Brazilian Air Force. 

Analysis before agreement

When making such an extensive commitment, Saab undertakes a comprehensive analysis of the country concerned before considering entering into an agreement.

“You have to understand the country and its conditions, its driving ...

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Today is the last day of LAAD 2017. Saab is exhibiting Gripen Full Scale Replica (FSR), Gripen Simulator and Gripen Maritime as well. If you are at the event, do visit Saab at Stand O20 (internal area) and Space J.OUT.70 (external area).​​

​At LIMA 2017, an RTAF Gripen Fighter performed aerial displays for the audience. Here are a few images chronicling the performance.

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Getting ready for the flight
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Engineers getting the aircraft ready for the display
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The Malaysian Defence Minister with the RTAF Gripen display team

Photo credit: Richard Cooper @COAPPhoto​

​Here are some pictures from the ongoing Langkawi International Maritime & Aerospace Exhibition (LIMA) 2017.

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A visitor flies Gripen in Virtual Reality
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Chief of Air Force, Sri Lanka at the Saab stand
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1st Admiral Zulkarnain, MMEA Northern Region, and Dato’ Rahman, Deputy Director General MMEA, at the Saab stand
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RTAF Gripen preparing for display rehearsal

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It is 10:25 in the morning at Čáslav air base and the sunrays are only just beginning to stream through the morning fog. There is no wind, all one can hear is the whistling sound of two Gripen fighters leaving their hangar. Soon, the whistle turns into a roar as the fighters ascend towards the sky. This is how a typical morning at the air base looks like.

The Czech Republic has been using Gripen system for over ten years to protect its airspace. The country also uses the fighters for NATO missions in countries like Iceland.

"The fighters are on constant standby to identify, escort, and if necessary, fight invasion of Czech airspace. Additionally, they also provide support to civil aviation, including escorting and providing guided landing of civilian aircraft, in case of technical failure or bad weather conditions,” says Jan Ducha, Ground Personnel commanding officer of the Czech Air Force.

Recounting his experience at this year's NATO Tiger Meet exercise in Saragosa, Spain, Jan says that Gripen is very easy to use and requires less staff as compared to other similar aircraft. Other countries participating with other aircraft systems brought up to 25 people per aircraft. To fly a Gripen, one needs only one pilot, one engineer and a mechanic (per aircraft), Jan adds. 

"What use is an aircraft of, if it is in a hangar, waiting for spare parts or if you need so much staff to attend to it that you cannot afford to fly ...

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