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Category: FEATURED VIDEOS

The upgrade known in Swedish term as MS20 involves a whole series of improvements and new functionality, both in terms of the aircraft itself and the ancillary support and training systems.​ Saab knows that its customers need a reliable, affordable and available fighter, against all threats, today and tomorrow. And that is why it makes Gripen. 

During the celebrations marking the 90th anniversary of the Swedish Air Force, Defense & Aerospace Report​ took the opportunity to speak to Ulf Nilsson, Senior Vice President and Head of Aeronautics, Saab, on the philosophy that drives the making and development of Gripen E and what makes the approach fundamentally different.

Future technology is, of course, hard to predict even three to four years down the line. Looking back 10-15 years, the pace of technology development could be predicted, but not so with the coming of the digital revolution. “Earlier, the pace of development of technology was setting the pace of development of capabilities of the fighter system. Not anymore though. This is a big change and the development platform has to be able to cope with this kind of a change,” says Nilsson. 

Keeping that in mind, Gripen E is created to be relevant even if the technology of today becomes obsolete tomorrow. That is one of the best features of the new Gripen: its flexibility, preserved in a balanced design, makes it extremely adaptable. 

Built upon the strong base of proven C/D platform, Gripen E redefines air-defence systems with its exciting new capabilities and significant cost reduction. Not only does Gripen E have what it takes to fly safely, when it comes to tactical and functional developments, it has more of an ‘app-based development’ approach, which makes it easier to upgrade the aircraft from time to time. “This is one of the major leaps forward when it ...

​Are you ready to fly? If yes, here is your chance to experience Gripen like never before. Download the 'Gripen Fighter Challenge' game and be ready to rule the sky.

Gripen Fighter Challenge is now available both for iOS and Android. You can download the game here and here.

The Gripen E programme has seen great progress and the aircraft is responding really well to all our test and verification activities. Since the unveiling of Gripen E in May, we have achieved major milestones and now we can add one more – the taxi testing. 

So, it’s time to roll!​

The traditional Christmas tree formation flight was conducted yesterday by Skaraborg air wing F7 with 12 Gripen. This is both a nice tradition that is followed every year and also a good exercise for the pilots flying in formation in such a big numbers. 

Next week air wing F17 in Ronneby and F 21 in Luleå, as well as the Air Force Flight School plan to fly their Christmas tree formation too.

​Full throttle. Just as the Gripen E programme is going at full speed, the GE F414G engine is doing the same in the test aircraft. Engine on.

Validation and verification activities such as tests in rigs and simulators have been performed and the ground test period is in full swing. The way model based development has been implemented, has been successful. "Power on" and engine starts are just two examples of important milestones that has been accomplished during the last months.

“We are encouraged about the progress in the programme. The aircraft is responding really well to all our test and verification activities. Since the rollout in May, we have performed major milestones such as powering on the aircraft and engine start. What is left before we can take off, is software qualification to formally prove what we already informally know through our extensive testing,” says Lars Ydreskog, Head of Operations at the Aeronautics business area.

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Saab and Brazilian aerospace conglomerate Embraer inaugurated the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN) in Gavião Peixoto, in the state of São Paulo yesterday.

The GDDN, located at Embraer premises in Gavião Peixoto - where the Gripen Flight Test Center and the Gripen Final Assembly will also be based - will be the hub for technology transfer and fighter development in the country. Partnering Saab and Embraer would be AEL Sistemas, Atech, Akaer and the Brazilian Air Force through its research department DCTA.

A Brazilian Government report quoted Colonel Julio Cesar Cardoso Tavares saying, "This project will allow Brazil to have autonomy to build fighter aircraft in future. It is a facility to back the country's efforts to develop high performance fighters."

The GDDN includes the development environment and simulators required to undertake the fighter development work. In addition, the GDDN is connected to Saab in Sweden and the industrial partners in Brazil, securing both technology transfer and efficient development.

“We have a long-term commitment to Brazil. The launch of the GDDN is a key milestone in the Brazilian Gripen programme as it will be the basis for the technology transfer and fighter development in the country,” said Håkan Buskhe, CEO and president of Saab.

Read the full story here.

​Experimental test pilot, André Brännström explains how a Gripen fighter simulator works and how it demonstrates the capabilities of the fighter.

​To fly in the Icelandic weather conditions, there are some preparations that have to be done. Here, Capt. Martin Špaček, a Czech Air Force Gripen pilot, describes how the daily life as pilot during the air policing mission in Iceland could look like.

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Welcome to the official Gripen blog by Saab. This site features information and commentary about the Gripen fighter jet.