Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

Gripen

The Smart Fighter

Quick Launch

Gripen > Categories

Category: TECHNOLOGY

gripen_28sept17.jpg

Since 1952, Swedish borders have been monitored day and night, all year around. No matter what time it is, Swedish territorial borders are being monitored. All over Sweden, there are radar stations constantly scanning the air and over land and sea.  When needed, the armed forces alert Gripen fighters to identify and intercept foreign aircraft. 

Several units of the Air Force are made up of Gripen fighters. It is the first operational fighter equipped with Beyond-Visual-Range-Air-To-Air-Missile, Meteor. Today, there are three air wings and six divisions equipped with Gripen fighters in the Swedish Air Force. The fighter aircraft has the ability to carry out operations against targets on the ground, in air and over water, with extreme precision, a high degree of flexibility and power. These units also conduct intelligence gathering missions and are always ready to defend Sweden's territory.​

Read full story here​.

wad.jpg
AEL Sistemas has launched the first panoramic panel of the Gripen fighter, reports Airway.com​.

"We are proud to deliver the prototype panel on schedule, helping Saab engineers to move forward with the integration work on the aircraft," says Sérgio Horta, president of AEL.

Saab selected AEL Sistemas (AEL) as a supplier in Brazil two years back for providing wide area display (WAD) and the head-up display (HUD). Both the WAD and HUD development programmes started in January 2015.

The WAD for Brazil’s Gripen NG aircraft is a single intelligent and full-redundant multi-purpose display system, full-colour, large-screen (19 x 8 in) with continuous image presentation and the state-of-the-art touch-screen controls capability. It is the primary source of all flight and mission information in the cockpit.

Saab and AEl Sistemas have also signed a contract for transfer of technology that focuses on developing human-machine interface (HMI) and workshops for avionics maintenance.

Read the full story here.

Image Courtesy: AEL Sistemas

​Richard Smith, Head of Marketing & Sales, Aeronautics, Saab, explains what a Gripen Aggressor can do.​

gripen_ aggressor.jpg
To be able to dominate your opponent, one needs to train with the best adversary. Training with world class opponents ensures the squad is ready to take on the most unexpected scenarios during a mission.

Realising the growth of adversary air combat training market, Saab has now launched the Gripen aggressor - the latest derivative of Gripen C. Gripen Aggressor provides an exceptional, dissimilar opponent aircraft system against which pilots will sharpen and refine their combat skills so as to fight and win against an advanced enemy threat.

“There is a major difference in the capabilities provided by the aggressors on the market today and what the need is for the coming years. In order to train as you fight, you need to fly advanced combat tactics against peer and near peer opponents like the Gripen Aggressor. Essentially world-class pilots need to train against world class opponents and that is the Gripen Aggressor”, says Richard Smith, head of Gripen marketing & sales at Saab.

The full-scale replica of Gripen Aggressor was unveiled at the DSEI exhibition in London last week. Saab is pitching Gripen Aggressor for RAF’s ASDOT (Air Support to Defence Operational Training) programme. One and two-seater Gripen fighters are already being used for the UK Empire Test Pilots’ School training. 

Besides ASDOT, Gripen Aggressor is also Saab's proposed solution for the United States Air Force’s Adversary Air (ADAIR).

Read the full story here.

gripen_300817.jpg
As India focusses on acquiring single-engine fighters now, Saab sees a huge window of opportunity, reports Gulf News.

The report says that within the next two years, the Indian Government will be placing an order for single-engine, medium-range fighter jets for the Indian Air Force (IAF).

Saab’s offer to India includes setting up of a full manufacturing facility; transfer of state-of-the-art technology; setting up of an aerospace eco-system in the country, and employment of a well-trained Indian workforce. 

“Saab has been ‘making in India’ on a variety of programmes for more than 40 years now. With a project the size of ‘Gripen in India’, we expect to build long-term partnerships with Indian companies,” says Robert Hewson, Vice-President and Head of Communications for Saab Asia Pacific.

Besides technology transfer, Saab is also banking on Gripen’s capabilities to meet the demands of future.

“Air Forces need, and must have, a future-proof aircraft. Gripen E is the future of fighter capability. Saab’s design philosophy focuses on continuous development, which means that future capabilities can be added to India’s aircraft by Indian engineers and we are looking at systems and design capabilities that will be in demand 30 years and more from now,” Hewson explained.​

Read the full story here.

gripenng33.jpg
One of the major deciding factors behind Brazil's selection of Gripen was Saab's technology transfer offer, says Vianney Goncalves Jr in an opinion piece in Aviation Week.

Even more decisive than the winning aircraft's lowest operational cost was its level of technology transfer. A major criterion for Brazilian engineers was the Swedish proposal for participation in the development of the two-seater version, he says. In addition to the transfer of know-how, Brazil also took the opportunity to reorganize its force structure.

The opinion piece dwells on the importance of the development of Gripen F and its potential role as a special sensor node for network centric warfare. Goncalves also discusses the wide-area display and the Link-BR2 datalink system developed in Brazil.

Read his opinion piece here.


czechgripen8.jpg
The Czech Air Force Gripen fighters now have air-to-ground capabilities, reports Ceskatelevize.cz.

With the new capabilities, the Czech Gripen will be able to do more than air defence missions. They will be able to perform air-to-ground strikes and engage with ground troops as well. The new weapons will not only increase the capabilities of the Czech Air Force but also prepare Gripen fighters for advanced NATO missions.

As a part of this upgrade, Czech fighters have been integrated with laser bombs and related software updates. According to the Ceskatelevize report, laser beams are very accurate and attacks can be made between five and twenty miles of height. 

"We will have to learn how to use the full range of ammunition that will be provided for Gripen," said Czech Tactical Air Force Commander Jan Ďucha.

Read the full post here.

Gripen_E_First_Flight-6394_edited.jpg
At 10:32 on 15 June 2017, Gripen E took off on its maiden flight, flown by a Saab test pilot. The aircraft (designation 39-8) left from Saab’s airfield in Linköping, Sweden and flew over the eastern parts of Östergötland for 40 minutes. During the flight, the aircraft carried out a number of actions to demonstrate various test criteria including the retracting and extending of the landing gear.

“The flight was just as expected, with the aircraft performance matching the experience in our simulations. Its acceleration performance is impressive with smooth handling. Needless to say, I’m very happy to have piloted this maiden flight,” says Marcus Wandt, Experimental Test Pilot, Saab.

Read more here.

gddn gripen.jpg

The transfer of technology through cooperation with Saab is extremely significant for increasing the technological competence of Brazilian industry," says Jackson Schneider, President and CEO of Embraer Defence and Security.

"Embraer and the other companies committed to this programme will benefit from the transfer of knowledge," he says. "It will make it possible for them to carry out future upgrades to the Gripen fleet and to compete in the market for coming generations of fighters."

Embraer has always been an important partner of Saab in Brazil’s Gripen programme. The opening of GDDN was a key milestone in the Gripen technology transfer programme. The GDDN is located at Embraer premises in Gavião Peixoto in the state of São Paulo. According to Schneider, GDDN can be described as a project work station with professionals mainly from Embraer and Saab, but also from other Brazilian industry partners and the Brazilian customer.

"We can use the Gripen Design and Development Network for future joint projects, such as an export version of the two-seater Gripen. We are also discussing potential additional cooperation outside the Gripen programme."

Schneider considers the project a first-class opportunity for both Embraer and Saab to exchange knowledge."Both companies are very experienced in the aeronautical market and this is a great opportunity to improve our expertise in the development and manufacturing process of a high -standard modern combat aircraft," he says.​

Gripen E4.jpg

“Model Based Development for Gripen E will allow tactical functions to be uploaded into the system in a span of days instead of years,” Combitech's CEO Lars Ydreskog said at an event in Linköping earlier this year.

The concept is similar to a smartphone structure wherein, just like apps, subsystems can be easily added or removed. Gripen E's avionics system has separate flight critical functions and tactical features which means the operator can add a new capability or feature without interfering with any flight critical functions.

With model based development, the number of system failures can be reduced by 90 percent and the errors can be rectified in days and not months. Another advantage of this system is that the verifications can be done in simulators which reduce the need for extensive test flights.

“It hereby ends the discussion if model-based development works or not,” Ydreskog said.

Read the full story here.

1 - 10 >