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Category: TECHNOLOGY

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Four Czech Gripen fighters and 30 Czech personnel are currently participating in the NATO Tiger Meet 2017 in Landivisiau, France, hosted by Flottille 11F squadron of the French Marine Nationale. As per the custom, one of the participating Gripen had a colourful tiger scheme on its tail.

The training missions in the Meet included simulated air combat exercises like search and destroy targets and rescue operations, and aerial refueling.

"The best part of the exercise is, of course, its extent and duration. You can find out the effectiveness of your own aerial combat tactics and complex mission planning," says the commander of the participating Czech squadron Lt. Col. Jaroslav Tomaňa.

Two days of the NATO Tiger Meet, 8th and 14 June, were Spotter's Days. On these two days, visitors could see and photograph all the participating fighter jets at five different spotting locations. 

NATO Tiger Meet 2017 will end tomorrow.

Read more here​.

Image Courtesy: Afbcaslav.cz​

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Saab has signed a contract with the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) regarding the continued support and maintenance of Gripen C/D. The contract is valued at approximately SEK 1.9 billion and will be in effect from June 2017 to December 2019.

The contract primarily covers design and support, component maintenance, spare parts, the provision of logistics, and the procurement of certain equipment. In addition, the contract also allows for the requisition of technical system support, aircraft maintenance with associated spare parts, and the management of obsolescence.

"This contract will ensure effective Gripen C/D operation and availability for the coming years. Our support solutions contribute to Gripen's low life-cycle cost and provide the Swedish Armed Forces and other Gripen customers with the most effective means by which to sustain their aircraft," says Torsten Öhman, Acting Head of the Support and Services business area within Saab.

Read the full story here.

Photo: Sören Nielsen​​

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A Hungarian Air Force Gripen will be participating in the upcoming Motril airshow which will be held at the Playa de Calahonda in Motril City, Spain. 

The Hungarian Gripen fighter will be putting up an aerial display for the audience present at the airshow. About 50,000 people are expected to attend the show. Besides Gripen, participating aircraft include names like AV-8B Harrier II and Zenair CH 601.

This will be the first time a Hungarian Air Force Gripen fighter will be on display in Spain. The airshow will be held on the 10th and 11th of June.

Read more here.

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Saab is focusing on developing the next generation of its RBS15 anti-ship missile for its domestic customer’s Gripen fighter and Visby class corvette, reports Monch.com.

According to Michael Hoglund, Head of Marketing and Sales for Missile Systems at Saab, the missiles need to be developed before the Gripen E fighters are introduced to the Swedish Air Force.

“The driving force for the timing of this is the Gripen E,” he says.

Saab received the order for the anti-ship missiles in March 2017. As per the contract, the missiles will be developed in in both air-launched and ship-launched configurations.

Read the full story here.


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“Model Based Development for Gripen E will allow tactical functions to be uploaded into the system in a span of days instead of years,” Combitech's newly-appointed CEO Lars Ydreskog said at a recently organised event in Linköping, Sweden.

The concept is similar to a smartphone structure wherein, just like apps, subsystems can be easily added or removed. Gripen E's avionics system has separate flight critical functions and tactical features which means the operator can add a new capability or feature without without interfering with any flight critical functions.

With model based development, the number of system failures can be reduced by 90 percent and the errors can be rectified in days and not months. Another advantage of this system is that the verifications can be done in simulators which reduces the need for extensive test flights.

“It is hereby ends the discussion if model-based development works or not,” Ydreskog said.

Read the full story here.

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Developing a fighter for less than 2 billion Euros is made possible by a number of factors and strategic decisions taken at the programme’s beginning. Finding less expensive ways to develop advanced products, which Saab describes as 'breaking the cost curve’, is one, reports Defence Aerospace​.

Strategies like buying a new engine (GE F414G) or ES-05 Raven AESA radar, and not developing these systems from a scratch – which can be an expensive process - have played an important role as well. But integrating these systems into Gripen E without spending a lot on integration cost was not easy.

According to Jerker Ahlqvist, Head of the Gripen programme, this was solved by adopting new ways of working, including model-based systems engineering (MBSE), model-based development (MBD), and agility. This is to say that the company’s simplified management structure was prepared to react quickly and adapt to change.

The report also mentioned two other factors that helped minimize cost. Saab allows engineers to take decisions without the interference of upper management or committees, which results into a faster development process.

The second factor, which in different guises is on the lips of every executive, is the sense that the company has a duty not only to develop the combat systems needed by the Swedish military, but to develop them at a price the country can afford, the report says.

Read the full story here.

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The transfer of technology through cooperation with Saab is extremely significant for increasing the technological competence of Brazilian industry," says Jackson Schneider, President and CEO of Embraer Defence and Security.

"Embraer and the other companies committed to this programme will benefit from the transfer of knowledge," he says. "It will make it possible for them to carry out future upgrades to the Gripen fleet and to compete in the market for coming generations of fighters."

Embraer has always been an important partner of Saab in Brazil’s Gripen programme. The opening of GDDN was a key milestone in the Gripen technology transfer programme. The GDDN is located at Embraer premises in Gavião Peixoto in the state of São Paulo. According to Schneider, GDDN can be described as a project work station with professionals mainly from Embraer and Saab, but also from other Brazilian industry partners and the Brazilian customer.

"We can use the Gripen Design and Development Network for future joint projects, such as an export version of the two-seater Gripen. We are also discussing potential additional cooperation outside the Gripen programme."

Schneider considers the project a first-class opportunity for both Embraer and Saab to exchange knowledge."Both companies are very experienced in the aeronautical market and this is a great opportunity to improve our expertise in the development and manufacturing process of a high -standard modern combat aircraft," he says.

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A full- scale replica of Gripen E adorns the entrance of the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN) in Gavião Peixoto, in the state of São Paulo. Inside, Brazilian and Swedish engineers work together on various 'work projects' under the Gripen NG development programme.

"The idea is that the Brazilian version of Gripen will eventually be manufactured here," says Jonas Petzén, Site and Development Manager at GDDN. “Meanwhile Saab and Embraer will together oversee the development of a two-seater version of Gripen."

The work has already begun on various 'work packages'. These cover the design of the cockpit, including new displays, rigs and simulators, pneumatic systems and ejection systems, overall design and avionics - all of which form the basic infrastructure for other work packages.

"The working climate is extremely creative and is a clear example of a situation where one plus one makes more than two," Petzén says.

According to Petzén, over the next few years, the focus of Saab's cooperation with Embraer and other partners in Brazil will be on development. "The simulator for the air force pilots will come online in 2017, and a manufacturing facility will gradually be built," he says.

One of the Swedish engineers, Johan Beckman who has moved to Brazil to work at GDDN, says things have got off to a great start. “It’s going really well and this is mainly due to the fact that our Brazilian colleagues spent a year in Linkoping. They know how Saab works and how we manage projects.”

Beckman ...

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In an interview with Defesaaereanaval.com, Bengt Janér, Director of the Gripen Brazil project at Saab, talks about the latest update on the Gripen programme, technology transfer and the role of Brazilian companies in the fighter development.

About the technology transfer process, Bengt says that it started in October 2015. About 150 Brazilian engineers are currently participating in the training program at the Gripen plant in Sweden. In total, there will be over 60 projects under the technology transfer programme, lasting up to 24 months.

Bengt adds that Brazilian company Akaer plays a very important role in the fighter’s development. Akaer’s involvement in the Gripen programme started in 2009. During the first phase, it did a preliminary study of the rear fuselage and parts of central fuselage, wings and main landing gear door. Starting 2012, Akaer was responsible for the complete development of the rear fuselage. After 2014, the company started working on optimization and detailing of the gun unit and central fuselage of the fighter.

Brazilian engineers who were in Sweden for training, are now working at the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN) in Gavião Peixoto, in the state of São Paulo, and at AEL and Akaer, companies that Saab has industrial cooperation agreement with.

On being asked about the status of the development process of various Gripen versions, Bengt added that Gripen E’s first test flight would take place in the second quarter of 2017 as planned and Saab is looking forward to talk about the development ...

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Adam Nelson from Air Base F17, is the adversary. He is the target that others have to intercept during the TTP (Tactics, Techniques and Procedures)exercise. Flying out of Air Force Division F 21 in Luleå, Sweden, Adam has to train air force pilots to hone their skills.

TTP is an annual Swedish air force exercise aimed to increase military capabilities and combat-readiness. This was the eighth TTP exercise and teams from Norway and Finland also participated under current Cross Border Training Agreement.

The training helps pilots improve interoperability. It also aims to increase their ability to handle live ammunition. One difference from previously completed TTP exercises was that this time, pilots flew Gripen fighters that have been upgraded to the MS20 configuration.

“It means we are learning ways to use the new capabilities of the fighter during exercises like this,” Adam says.

“During TTP, we developed techniques that will be useful in future. This exercise makes us better prepared for future exercises like Aurora,” he adds.

Read the full story here

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